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Planning & Development

Planning & Development

  • This guide by Drs. Scott Nissen, Andrew Norton, Anna Sher, and Dan Bean offers key options and considerations for tamarisk treatment, including biocontrol, targeted guidance on how to develop management plans, implement various control strategies, and plan restoration for treated sites. Useful resource as an accompaniment to Sher et al. 2010. 
     
    Nissen et al. 2010.   
  • Written by 44 of the field's most prominent scholars and scientists, this volume compiles 25 essays on tamarisk--its biology, ecology, politics, management, and the ethical issues involved with designating a particular species as "good" or "bad". The book analyzes the controversy surrounding tamarisk's role in our ecosystems and what should be done about it.

     

  • This Tamarisk Coalition developed resource allows users to estimate tamarisk and Russian olive removal and restoration costs based on existing site parameters. 

  • The Land Treatment Digital Library (LTDL) was created by the U.S. Geological Survey to catalog legacy land treatment information on Bureau of Land Management lands in the western United States. The LTDL can be used by federal managers and scientists for compiling information for data-calls, producing maps, generating reports, and conducting analyses at varying spatial and temporal scales. The LTDL currently houses 26,621 treatments from BLM lands across 13 states. 

  • This guide, a publication of the Nueces River Authority, describes riparian areas and their management, discusses general riparian restoration guidelines, delves into special issues in these areas, and provides assessment and monitoring information. 

  • The Association of Wetland Managers (ASWM) works hard to stay abreast of time sensitive hot topics, including new policies, regulations and trending topics of interest to those involved and/or interested in wetland management and practice. From time to time, these topics do not fit in any of our current webinar series offerings so ASWM started offering a Hot Topics Webinar Series as a way to get important information out quickly to a broad audience. Some of the topics in the past have included the Clean Water Rule, the Ramsar Convention and international projects, complex legal cases, environmental economics and more. These webinars are advertised through our website, newsletters, social media and emails. There is no specific day of the month when these webinars occur. For more information and/or to join our email list for notices about upcoming events, please contact Laura Burchill at laura@aswm.org.

  • In California’s Central Valley, widespread flow regulation and land development have greatly reduced the extent and sustainability of native cottonwood and willow riparian forests, which provide critical habitat for many species of wildlife and fish. The results of a three-year study of seedling recruitment processes were used to develop an ecological modeling approach for supporting restoration planning.
  • Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (IHA) is a software program, developed by The Nature Conservancy, that provides useful information for those trying to understand the hydrologic impacts of human activities or trying to develop environmental flow recommendations for water managers. Nearly 2,000 water resource managers, hydrologists, ecologists, researchers and policy makers from around the world have used this program to assess how rivers, lakes and groundwater basins have been affected by human activities over time – or to evaluate future water management scenarios.
     
  • Working with managers, Rocky Moutain Research Station researchers have evaluated the available treatments for short-term rehabilitation of both smaller, hand-built and larger, machine-built burn piles. For the smaller piles, they found that both soil nitrogen and plant cover recovered to a level similar to that of the surrounding forest within two years, indicating that these scars may not need rehabilitation unless in a sensitive area. Seeding with native mountain brome was an effective option for the larger piles, whereas mechanical treatment either alone or with seeding did not increase plant cover. The root causes behind the long-term lack of trees are not yet clear, and the next step is to conduct field and lab studies to evaluate whether soil factors, competition with grasses, and/or herbivory are possible explanations.
  • This NRCS document  describes techniques related to the rehabilitation of a degraded wetland or the reestablishment of a wetland so that soils, hydrology, vegetative community, and habitat are a close approximation of the original natural condition that existed prior to modification to the extent practicable.

  • This NRCS document provides guidance on the augmentation of wetland functions beyond the original natural conditions on a former, degraded, or naturally functioning wetland site; sometimes at the expense of other functions.

  • This document describes NRCS standards for Wetland Wildlife Habitat Management. 

  • This NRCS Conservation Practice Standard provides guidance on the creation of a wetland on a site location that was historically non-wetland.

  • This publication has been prepared by the Public Lands Foundation to define and clarify the status of federal public lands in America and to answer questions people pose on a daily basis, such as:
     
    • How did the United States acquire the public lands owned collectively by the American people?
    • How did the United States transfer most of the original public lands to state, private and other ownerships?
    • How did the Bureau of Land Management, an agency within the Department of the Interior, become responsible for administering its remaining 245 million acres of public domain lands, now known as the National System of Public Lands?
    • How does federal ownership and management of public domain lands benefit Americans? 
  • The purpose of the Study, funded by the Bureau of Reclamation, was to define current and future imbalances in water supply and demand in the Basin and the adjacent areas of the Basin States that receive Colorado River water over the next 50 years (through 2060), and to develop and analyze adaptation and mitigation strategies to resolve those imbalances.

  • This document is primarily intended to provide restoration guidance for land owners and land managers. Emphasis is placed on the use of planning, evaluation, and removal techniques that can minimize active revegetation efforts.  Information about species and planting methods appropriate to this watershed is also included.  In addition, some suggestions about Russian olive removal techniques and/or land management practices that facilitate native plant regeneration are also provided.

  • In an effort to proactively protect water quality, Colorado has implemented Best Management Practices (BMPs) for forestry activities. BMPs are a set of water-quality protection measures and guidelines that provide direction on planning, roads, Streamside Management Zones (SMZs), timber harvesting, pesticides and fertilizers, stream crossings and fire management.  
     
    In September 2012, an interdisciplinary team visited six timber-harvest sites in southwest Colorado to assess Colorado forestry BMP application and effectiveness. Each site was evaluated on planning, roads, SMZs, timber harvesting, hazardous substances, stream crossings and fire management, according to written criteria in the Field Audit Rating Guide.
  • While focused on Victoria, Australia, this guide provides any restoration practitioner with helpful information on highly efficient and cost effective revegetation methods. This publication aims to provide the practical 'know how' to help carry out your revegetation from start to finish. Section A covers the steps involved in a revegetation program, from planning and preparation to monitoring.
  • The Colorado River Basin Water Supply and Demand Study (Study), initiated in January
    2010, was conducted by the Bureau of Reclamation’s (Reclamation) Upper Colorado and
    Lower Colorado regions, and agencies representing the seven Colorado River Basin States.
    As defined in the Plan of Study, the purpose of the Study is to define current and
    future imbalances in water supply and demand in the Basin and the adjacent areas of the
    Basin States that receive Colorado River water over the next 50 years (through 2060), and to
    develop and analyze adaptation and mitigation strategies to resolve those imbalances. The
    Study does not result in a decision as to how future imbalances will or should be addressed.
    Rather, the Study provides a common technical foundation that frames the range of potential
    imbalances that may be faced in the future and the range of solutions that may be considered
    to resolve those imbalances.
  • In 2012, the Tamarisk Coalition, in coordination with Tetra Tech and the City of Grand Junction, developed restoration recommendations for the Colorado River from Loma to Palisade. The recommendations, which are presented as an engineering appendix, were designed to support the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers effort for developing and evaluation the Colorado River Ecosystem Restoration project, in accordance with Section 206 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996.
     
     
  • This paper describes way that the state of California could benefit from enacting goals in the National Seed Strategy for Rehabilitation and Restoration

  • This document, updated in 2008, is a consolidated woody invasive species management plan for Colorado’s Colorado, Gunnison, Uncompahgre, Dolores, White, andYampa/Green Watersheds.

  • In this report, a restoration and monitoring plan for the San Rafael River, a tributary to the Green River in the upper Colorado River Basin, is presented. The plan is intended to guide restoration and management of the San Rafael River over the next 40-50 years and is developed as an adaptive management plan. The recommended restoration actions are intended to recover and enhance natural river processes, and are based on the best available information regarding the history of hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological changes that have occurred on the river over the last century. Sites for implementation are prioritized systematically using data on stream and riparian habitat and potential response of native fish populations to restoration. An experimental design is recommended for implementing restoration actions. Combined with sufficient monitoring, the experimental design will help in identifying the most successful restoration actions. The most successful restoration actions can then be applied to other sites on the San Rafael River and restoration of other river systems.

  • The intent of this user’s guide is to provide groups interested in setting up a viable prevention program in their area with the steps and resources to initiate and develop a weed prevention area (WPA).
  • This publication is dedicated to the stewardship of forest land resources – especially clean water. It outlines Best Management Practices (BMPs) for the protection of natural resources. These BMPs apply to all forest management activities, including product harvests, fuels mitigation projects and forest health treatments.
  • TechLine is a suite of print and online resources that provide invasive plant professionals access to new, innovative, and proven science-based information. The purpose of TechLine is to support invasive plant management programs by connecting researchers with managers of federal, state, county, and private lands so they may share the successes of their programs, techniques, and methods and learn from one another. 

  • This manual is intended to assist both the experienced revegetation professional as well as a landowner new to revegetation. It was developed through a synthesis of the best current research combined with experience from actual project managers in the Upper Colorado River Basin. The organization and recommendations of this manual generally follow the 7-step process recommended for tamarisk projects (defining a goal, establish a realistic restoration objective, prioritize and select sites, create site-specific restoration plan, implement plan, conduct post-project monitoring, and engage adaptive management). 
     
    This manual can be purchased from Dr. Anna Sher, via her website.
  • This handbook discusses the major aspects of forest roads management as it relates to their design, location, inspection, maintenance and repair. Most private and state forest roads are already in existence, thus the primary focus of th  is publication is to assist landowners in the management of these in-place roads.
  • The Roadmap for Considering Water for Arizona’s Natural Areas contains information on the current scientific understanding of water for natural areas and existing legal considerations for providing water to natural areas, examples of where natural areas are already included in water management decisions, and an overview of available paths forward for including natural areas alongside human uses.

  • This website provides a suite of resources produced by the Sonoran Institute, an Arizona based nonprofit focused on connecting people and communities with the natural resources that nourish and sustain them. 

  • This brochure details resources available for private landwoners interested in planning and implementing restoration on their lands in Mesa County, Colorado. 

  • This strategy addresses the long-term management of saltcedar, Russian olive, and Siberian elm in the narrow belts of riparian vegetation along the Rio Grande, Pecos, Canadian, San Juan, and Gila/San Francisco River systems, including connected perennial, intermittent, and ephemeral streams.

  • This USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service website provides info on weed risk assessments completed to date. They are provided for interested stakeholders and may be useful in setting local policies or for informing resource managers. 

  • This biodiversity scorecard provides a snapshot of the current conservation status of Colorado's rare and imperiled species, and its most widespread ecological systems. The Colorado Natural Heritage Program
    took a systematic and repeatable approach to these assessments, focusing on: quality, quantity, threats, and level of current protection. Resulting scores for these factors were then combined to produce an overall conservation status score. Successful implementation of a comprehensive conservation strategy should result in maintaining or improving these scores over time.
  • The Great Basin LCC annual webinar series provides an opportunity for land managers and scientists working in the Great Basin to discuss their latest research and how to incorporate the research into on-the-ground efforts. Each webinar includes a 30 minute overview of a project co-presented by a scientist and manager, followed by a discussion focused on how the work can be applied and possible collaborations.

  • This document presents a statewide assessment on the potential future influences of a changing climate on species and ecosystems of particular importance to the Bureau of Land Management within Colorado, with the goal of facilitating development of the best possible climate change adaptations to meet future conditions. 
     
     
     
     
     
  • These resources, including a long-term management calculator, handbook, and factsheet are designed to help practitioners calculate how to budget for lasting conservation outcomes for restoration sites. 

  • The River Restoration Analysis Tool, or RiverRAT. River RAT is a river project development and evaluation tool. It was developed to facilitate consistent and thorough evaluation of the potential impacts of proposed projects on river habitat. The tool is supported by a source document that provides a comprehensive synthesis of the watershed and river sciences relevant to restoration planning and design, a project risk evaluation matrix, and a separate comprehensive checklist of information necessary to review project proposals.

  • Abstract:
     
    Successful rangeland management maintains or restores the ability of riparian plant communities to capture sediment and stabilize streambanks. Management actions are most effective when they are focused on the vegetated streambank closest to the active channel, the greenline, where vegetation most influences erosion, deposition, landform, and water quality. Effective grazing management plans balance grazing periods, especially those with more time for re-grazing, with opportunities for plant growth by adjusting grazing timing, duration, intensity, and/or variation of use and recovery.
     
    Emphasizing either: a) schedules of grazing and recovery, or b) limited utilization level within the same growing season, is a fundamental choice which drives management actions, grazing criteria, and methods for short-term monitoring. To meet resource objectives and allow riparian recovery, managers use many tools and practices that allow rather than impede recovery. Economic decisions are based on both evaluation of investments and ongoing or variable costs, themselves justified by reduced expenses, increased production, or improved resource values. Ongoing management adjusts actions using short-term monitoring focused on chosen strategies. Long-term monitoring refocuses management to target priority areas first for needed functions, and then for desired resource values. Once riparian functions are established, management enables further recovery and resilience and provides opportunities for a greater variety of grazing strategies.
  • A great deal of effort has been devoted to developing guidance for stream restoration and rehabilitation. The available resources are diverse, reflecting the wide ranging approaches used and expertise required to develop stream restoration projects. To help practitioners sort through all of this information, a technical note has been developed to provide a guide to the wealth of information available. The document structure is primarily a series of short literature reviews followed by a hyperlinked reference list for the reader to find more information on each topic. The primary topics incorporated into this guidance include general methods, an overview of stream processes and restoration, case studies, and methods for data compilation, preliminary assessments, and field data collection. Analysis methods and tools, and planning and design guidance for specific restoration features, are also provided. This technical note is a bibliographic repository of information available to assist professionals with the process of planning, analyzing, and designing stream restoration and rehabilitation projects. 
  • A well-designed revegetation plan is a foundational component of a successful stream restoration project. It helps to ensure the establishment and long-term viability of a healthy riparian corridor, which is critical to stream ecology and stream structure. This technical guidance document provides information and recommendations on:
    • Important elements to consider when developing a revegetation plan for a stream restoration project
    • Construction specifications within revegetation plans
    • Items to address during and after construction
  • This groundbreaking new publication from the Society for Ecological Restoration provides updated and expanded guidance on the practice of ecological restoration, clarifies the breadth of ecological restoration and allied environmental repair activities, and includes ideas and input from a diverse international group of restoration scientists and practitioners.

  • Bioengineering practices provide resiliency for streambanks, enhance wildlife habitat, enhance organic matter inputs to streams, improve water quality, increase floodplain roughness, and heighten landscape aesthetics so important to countless residents, visitors, and businesses. Accordingly, the authors have created the following manuscript to:
    • Provide guidelines for a comprehensive bioengineering strategy;
    • Incorporate design elements that impart site stability and resilience;
    • Include project recommendations that minimize risk during periods of vulnerability;
    • Increase understanding of how to properly apply bioengineering and revegetation techniques;
    • Provide background resources on the combined forces of water and gravity as they pertain to bioengineered structures; and
    • Create a searchable Revegetation Matrix for the primary native restoration species useful for flood recovery and other riparian areas throughout Colorado.
  • The U.S. Geological Survey’s Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center convened a workshop June 23-25, 2015, in Flagstaff, Ariz. for practitioners in restoration science to share general principles, successful restoration practices, and discuss the challenges that face those practicing riparian restoration in the southwestern United States. Presenters from the Colorado River and the Rio Grande basins, offered their perspectives and experiences in restoration at the local, reach and watershed scale. Outcomes of the workshop include this Proceedings volume, which is composed of extended abstracts of most of the presentations given at the workshop, and recommendations or information needs identified by participants. The organization of the Proceedings follows a general progression from local scale restoration to river and watershed scale approaches, and finishes with restoration assessments and monitoring.
     
  • Strategic planning is increasingly recognized as necessary for providing the greatest possible conservation benefits for restoration efforts. Rigorous, science-based resource assessment, combined with acknowledgement of broader basin trends, provides a solid foundation for determining effective projects. It is equally important that methods used to prioritize conservation investments are simple and practical enough that they can be implemented in a timely manner and by a variety of resource managers.
     
    With the help of local and regional natural resource professionals, this report provides a broad-scale, spatially-explicit assessment of 146 miles (~20,000 acres) of the Colorado River mainstem in Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah that will function as the basis for a systematic, practical approach to conservation planning and riparian restoration prioritization.
  • This website provides links to past webinars hosted by the Conservation Biology Institute. Topics are wide ranging. 

  • The four primary objectives of this project were to: (1) compile existing geospatial data regarding the location and type of wetlands in Colorado; (2) initiate an on-the-ground pilot project to assess the ecological condition of common wetland types in one hydrologic basin (Rio Grande Headwaters, HUC 6: 130100); (3) develop statewide strategies for setting wetland restoration priorities funded by CPW’s Wetlands Program; and (4) develop an interactive online mapping tool to transfer this information to local and statewide partners in wetlands conservation. This report is broken into three sections. Section 1 is an overview of the project; Section 2 describes Objective 1, part of Objective 3, and Objective 4; and Section 3 details Objective 2. The actual strategic plan of the CPW Wetlands Program can be found in a companion document.

  • The objective of the Healthy Rivers Assessment, authored by The Nature Conservancy, is to serve as a resource and guidance document to provide current freshwater ecosystem baselines and inform project design and prioritization.
     
    This analysis offers a comprehensive assessment of freshwater ecosystems in Colorado, scaled to the HUC 12 subwatershed level, and offers insight into opportunities to maintain, protect, and restore rivers and streams throughout Colorado. 
  • A presentation explaining and developing strategies for holistic management of watersheds.

  • The Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program has requested experimental flow releases from Flaming Gorge Dam for (1) elevated summer base flows to promote larval endangered Colorado pikeminnow, and (2) midsummer spike flows to disadvantage spawning invasive smallmouth bass. This white paper explores the effects of these proposed flow modifications on riparian vegetation and sediment deposition downstream along the Green River. Although modest in magnitude, the elevated base flows and possible associated reductions in magnitude or duration of peak flows would exacerbate a long-term trend of flow stabilization on the Green River that is already leading to proliferation of vegetation including invasive tamarisk along the channel and associated sediment deposition, channel narrowing and channel simplification. Midsummer spike flows could promote establishment of late-flowering plants like tamarisk. Because channel narrowing and simplification threaten persistence and quality of backwater and side channel features needed by endangered fish, the proposed flow modifications could lead to degradation of fish habitat. Channel narrowing and vegetation encroachment could be countered by increases in peak flows or reductions in base flows in some years and by prescription of rapid flow declines following midsummer spike flows. These strategies for reducing vegetation encroachment would need to be balanced with flow needs of other riverine resources. Use of high flows to remove unwanted vegetation is constrained by current operational guidance for Flaming Gorge Dam, which attempts to limit spills (i.e., flows greater than 8600 ft3/s) that might contribute to cavitation and lead to dam safety concerns. Therefore, reversing vegetation encroachment is more likely to succeed if implemented while plants are still small. Annual monitoring of near-channel vegetation and topography would enable managers to prescribe a timely hydrologic response in case the proposed flow experiments lead to vegetation encroachment and habitat degradation.

  • Using high-resolution  multitemporal, multispectral data, the authors classified tamarisk defoliation in the Glen Canyon area in Arizona. The high spatial resolution classification provides key information to effectively inform restoration treatments regarding where and how much mechanical removal or controlled burning could be performed. Furthermore, the defoliated tamarisk classification can help understand the site-specific and spatially-variable relationship between tamarisk and the tamarisk beetle at this critical state when their interactions are still developing and currently unknown. 

  •  
    Author(s): R. Roy Johnson; Steven W. Carothers; Deborah M. Finch; Kenneth J. Kingsley; John T. Stanley
     
    Fifty years ago, riparian habitats were not recognized for their extensive and critical contributions to wildlife and the ecosystem function of watersheds. This changed as riparian values were identified and documented, and the science of riparian ecology developed steadily. Papers in this volume range from the more mesic northwestern United States to the arid Southwest and Mexico. More than two dozen authors - most with decades of experience - review the origins of riparian science in the western United States, document what is currently known about riparian ecosystems, and project future needs. Topics are widespread and include: interactions with fire, climate change, and declining water; impacts from exotic species; unintended consequences of biological control; the role of small mammals; watershed response to beavers; watershed and riparian changes; changes below large dams; water birds of the Colorado River Delta; and terrestrial vertebrates of mesquite bosques. Appendices and references chronicle the field’s literature, authors, "riparian pioneers," and conferences. >> Volume 2 is also available on Treesearch: https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/60500
  • Rapid Monitoring Protocol used in the DRRP

  • This manual details the very basics of restoration planning, techniques like planting, seeding, and preparing soil, and will also cover topics such as basic trail maintenance techniques that can be used in conjunction with common restoration ideas, as well as mechanized restoration, and more.  This manual, originally developed at Grand Canyon National Park (GRCA), applies to a broad range of environments. The techniques discussed were used in elevations ranging from 1500 to 9000 feet. Those elevations include the following major vegetation types: Mojave Desert Scrub, Sonoran Desert Scrub, Great Basin Desert Scrub, Pinyon Juniper Woodland, Ponderosa Pine Forest, and Spruce-Fir Forest. Many projects were completed in or near desert riparian areas, while many others were completed on the dry North and South Rims of the park.

  • The purpose of the Stream Stewardship and Recovery Handbook is to create an educational resource for private landowners to better understand their streamside properties in the context of the larger watershed, what they can do to practice good stream stewardship and when/how they should engage outside help for stewardship or recovery projects.

Resources for Private Landowners

  • This presentation provides information on voluntary programs offered by the US Fish & Wildlife Service that can assist private landowners in habitat improvement and protection. 

  • Landhelp.info is for private land owners and managers, professionals, helpers, and students to learn how to better manage lands, animals and people.

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    Individual people are responsible for creating the trash that clogs our waterways, and it’s often up to individual people to clean that trash up. Hosting a river cleanup project in your area is a great way to not only improve the health of your local waterway, but to form new friendships with like-minded people. 
     
    Get expert advice from seasoned river cleanup organizations on hosting the most effective project possible.  
     
  • This list of chemical weed mix recommendations was produced by Weld County, Colorado.

  • Bringing Birds Home is a manual that describes how to proactively improve riparian habitat for bird species in Mesa County, Colorado.  

    This guide was made possible by a grant from the Bird Conservancy of the Rockies and was produced by RiversEdge West, with help from the Grand Valley Audubon Society, Tucson Audubon Society, and Audubon Arizona.

     
  •  
     
    Private Lands Stewardship: Connecting People, Birds and Land
     
    Kelsea Holloway1*, Lauren Connell2, Angela Dwyer3
     
    1Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Greeley, Colorado, US; kelsea.holloway@usda.gov
    2Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Fort Collins, Colorado, US; lauren.connell@birdconservancy .org
    3Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Fort Collins, Colorado, US; angela.dwyer@birdconservancy .org
     
     
    Reversing the decline of bird populations in North America requires creative solutions that transcend fence lines, funding sources, and individual agency goals. Bird Conservancy of the Rockies partners with federal, state, non-governmental agencies, and private landowners to conserve birds and their habitats through an integrated model of science, education and private lands stewardship. Private lands stewardship is vital to bird conservation, as more than 70% of land in the U.S. is privately owned. Due primarily to habitat loss both bird abundance and wetland and riparian habitats have significantly declined since the mid-1900s. We present a collaborative model for addressing declines of wetland and riparian habitats on private lands by connecting landowners with conservation planning, funding opportunities, and other resources to mutually benefit their agricultural operations, land, water and wildlife habitat. We will present examples of collaborative solutions including prescribed riparian grazing plans, wetland restorations and management, invasive species control, and educational workshops. Our biologists achieve increased conservation as integrated members of their agricultural communities, where they build relationships that influence hearts and minds. Together we can provide a world where birds are forever abundant, healthy landscapes persist, and humans can be inspired by their curiosity and love of nature.
     
     
     
  • This attachment includes range and pasture chemical recommendations. These recommendations were produced by Weld County, Colorado.

  • Valerie J. Horncastle, Carol L. Chambers, Brett G. Dickson

    First published: 13 January 2019

    https://doi.org/10.1002/jwmg.21635

     

    ABSTRACT

    Livestock grazing and fire can intensively modify montane meadows. Understanding how these factors affect habitat, species richness, and diversity of small mammals can inform management decisions. Few studies have investigated the independent and synergistic effects of grazing and wildfire on vegetation and small‐mammal communities, and none have focused on montane meadows in the southwestern United States. In 2012 and 2013, we captured small mammals at 105 sites to contrast occupancy, species richness, and diversity among livestock grazing levels (present, absent), wildfire severity (unburned, low, or moderate), and meadow classifications (small or large, wet or dry) in Arizona, USA. During 13,741 trap nights, we captured 1,885 rodents of 8 species. Two species represented 88% of captures: deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) and Arizona montane vole (Microtus montanus arizonensis). Deer mice, Navajo Mogollon voles (Microtus mogollonensis navaho), and thirteen‐lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus monticola; a subspecies endemic to the White Mountains, AZ) had higher occupancy in large, ungrazed meadows compared to small, grazed meadows. Species richness was greater in unburned than burned sites and small meadows than large. However, higher diversity occurred in ungrazed and dry compared to grazed and wet meadows. Three species demonstrated weak relationships between wildfire and occupancy, suggesting short‐term (<2 yrs) effects of low to moderate burn severity for these species or their habitat. Livestock grazing had a greater effect than wildfire on the small‐mammal community by altering vegetation or other habitat elements and thus decreasing population sizes. Reducing livestock grazing would benefit small‐mammal species and increase diversity and abundance of the small‐mammal community in montane meadows. © 2019 The Wildlife Society.

  • The purpose of the Stream Stewardship and Recovery Handbook is to create an educational resource for private landowners to better understand their streamside properties in the context of the larger watershed, what they can do to practice good stream stewardship and when/how they should engage outside help for stewardship or recovery projects.

  •  
     
     
    Private Lands Stewardship: Connecting People, Birds and Land
     
    Kelsea Holloway1*, Lauren Connell2, Angela Dwyer3
     
    1Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Greeley, Colorado, US; kelsea.holloway@usda.gov
    2Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Fort Collins, Colorado, US; lauren.connell@birdconservancy .org
    3Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Fort Collins, Colorado, US; angela.dwyer@birdconservancy .org
     
     
    Reversing the decline of bird populations in North America requires creative solutions that transcend fence lines, funding sources, and individual agency goals. Bird Conservancy of the Rockies partners with federal, state, non-governmental agencies, and private landowners to conserve birds and their habitats through an integrated model of science, education and private lands stewardship. Private lands stewardship is vital to bird conservation, as more than 70% of land in the U.S. is privately owned. Due primarily to habitat loss both bird abundance and wetland and riparian habitats have significantly declined since the mid-1900s. We present a collaborative model for addressing declines of wetland and riparian habitats on private lands by connecting landowners with conservation planning, funding opportunities, and other resources to mutually benefit their agricultural operations, land, water and wildlife habitat. We will present examples of collaborative solutions including prescribed riparian grazing plans, wetland restorations and management, invasive species control, and educational workshops. Our biologists achieve increased conservation as integrated members of their agricultural communities, where they build relationships that influence hearts and minds. Together we can provide a world where birds are forever abundant, healthy landscapes persist, and humans can be inspired by their curiosity and love of nature.
     
     
     
     
  • Rapid Monitoring Protocol used in the DRRP

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