You are here

Resources for Private Landowners

Resources for Private Landowners

  •  
     
    Private Lands Stewardship: Connecting People, Birds and Land
     
    Kelsea Holloway1*, Lauren Connell2, Angela Dwyer3
     
    1Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Greeley, Colorado, US; kelsea.holloway@usda.gov
    2Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Fort Collins, Colorado, US; lauren.connell@birdconservancy .org
    3Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Fort Collins, Colorado, US; angela.dwyer@birdconservancy .org
     
     
    Reversing the decline of bird populations in North America requires creative solutions that transcend fence lines, funding sources, and individual agency goals. Bird Conservancy of the Rockies partners with federal, state, non-governmental agencies, and private landowners to conserve birds and their habitats through an integrated model of science, education and private lands stewardship. Private lands stewardship is vital to bird conservation, as more than 70% of land in the U.S. is privately owned. Due primarily to habitat loss both bird abundance and wetland and riparian habitats have significantly declined since the mid-1900s. We present a collaborative model for addressing declines of wetland and riparian habitats on private lands by connecting landowners with conservation planning, funding opportunities, and other resources to mutually benefit their agricultural operations, land, water and wildlife habitat. We will present examples of collaborative solutions including prescribed riparian grazing plans, wetland restorations and management, invasive species control, and educational workshops. Our biologists achieve increased conservation as integrated members of their agricultural communities, where they build relationships that influence hearts and minds. Together we can provide a world where birds are forever abundant, healthy landscapes persist, and humans can be inspired by their curiosity and love of nature.
     
     
     
  • Landhelp.info is for private land owners and managers, professionals, helpers, and students to learn how to better manage lands, animals and people.

  • This attachment includes range and pasture chemical recommendations. These recommendations were produced by Weld County, Colorado.

  • Valerie J. Horncastle, Carol L. Chambers, Brett G. Dickson

    First published: 13 January 2019

    https://doi.org/10.1002/jwmg.21635

     

    ABSTRACT

    Livestock grazing and fire can intensively modify montane meadows. Understanding how these factors affect habitat, species richness, and diversity of small mammals can inform management decisions. Few studies have investigated the independent and synergistic effects of grazing and wildfire on vegetation and small‐mammal communities, and none have focused on montane meadows in the southwestern United States. In 2012 and 2013, we captured small mammals at 105 sites to contrast occupancy, species richness, and diversity among livestock grazing levels (present, absent), wildfire severity (unburned, low, or moderate), and meadow classifications (small or large, wet or dry) in Arizona, USA. During 13,741 trap nights, we captured 1,885 rodents of 8 species. Two species represented 88% of captures: deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) and Arizona montane vole (Microtus montanus arizonensis). Deer mice, Navajo Mogollon voles (Microtus mogollonensis navaho), and thirteen‐lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus monticola; a subspecies endemic to the White Mountains, AZ) had higher occupancy in large, ungrazed meadows compared to small, grazed meadows. Species richness was greater in unburned than burned sites and small meadows than large. However, higher diversity occurred in ungrazed and dry compared to grazed and wet meadows. Three species demonstrated weak relationships between wildfire and occupancy, suggesting short‐term (<2 yrs) effects of low to moderate burn severity for these species or their habitat. Livestock grazing had a greater effect than wildfire on the small‐mammal community by altering vegetation or other habitat elements and thus decreasing population sizes. Reducing livestock grazing would benefit small‐mammal species and increase diversity and abundance of the small‐mammal community in montane meadows. © 2019 The Wildlife Society.

  • The purpose of the Stream Stewardship and Recovery Handbook is to create an educational resource for private landowners to better understand their streamside properties in the context of the larger watershed, what they can do to practice good stream stewardship and when/how they should engage outside help for stewardship or recovery projects.

  •  
     
     
    Private Lands Stewardship: Connecting People, Birds and Land
     
    Kelsea Holloway1*, Lauren Connell2, Angela Dwyer3
     
    1Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Greeley, Colorado, US; kelsea.holloway@usda.gov
    2Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Fort Collins, Colorado, US; lauren.connell@birdconservancy .org
    3Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Fort Collins, Colorado, US; angela.dwyer@birdconservancy .org
     
     
    Reversing the decline of bird populations in North America requires creative solutions that transcend fence lines, funding sources, and individual agency goals. Bird Conservancy of the Rockies partners with federal, state, non-governmental agencies, and private landowners to conserve birds and their habitats through an integrated model of science, education and private lands stewardship. Private lands stewardship is vital to bird conservation, as more than 70% of land in the U.S. is privately owned. Due primarily to habitat loss both bird abundance and wetland and riparian habitats have significantly declined since the mid-1900s. We present a collaborative model for addressing declines of wetland and riparian habitats on private lands by connecting landowners with conservation planning, funding opportunities, and other resources to mutually benefit their agricultural operations, land, water and wildlife habitat. We will present examples of collaborative solutions including prescribed riparian grazing plans, wetland restorations and management, invasive species control, and educational workshops. Our biologists achieve increased conservation as integrated members of their agricultural communities, where they build relationships that influence hearts and minds. Together we can provide a world where birds are forever abundant, healthy landscapes persist, and humans can be inspired by their curiosity and love of nature.
     
     
     
     
  •  

    Individual people are responsible for creating the trash that clogs our waterways, and it’s often up to individual people to clean that trash up. Hosting a river cleanup project in your area is a great way to not only improve the health of your local waterway, but to form new friendships with like-minded people. 
     
    Get expert advice from seasoned river cleanup organizations on hosting the most effective project possible.  
     
  • Rapid Monitoring Protocol used in the DRRP

  • This presentation provides information on voluntary programs offered by the US Fish & Wildlife Service that can assist private landowners in habitat improvement and protection. 

  • This list of chemical weed mix recommendations was produced by Weld County, Colorado.

  • Bringing Birds Home is a manual that describes how to proactively improve riparian habitat for bird species in Mesa County, Colorado.  

    This guide was made possible by a grant from the Bird Conservancy of the Rockies and was produced by RiversEdge West, with help from the Grand Valley Audubon Society, Tucson Audubon Society, and Audubon Arizona.

     

RiversEdge West's

mission is to advance the restoration of riparian lands through collaboration, education, and technical assistance.

Donate